Reclaiming Land

Friday 19 March 2021
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NC has finally become aware that there is nothing in place to address the issue of closure when hundreds of millions of tons of solar farm materials containing hazardous substances from solar facilities wear out.
Seems that the lawmakers in North Carolina have finally become aware that there is nothing in place to address the issue of closure when hundreds of millions of tons of solar farm materials containing hazardous substances from solar facilities wear out.

A spokesperson for the North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association admitted that NO state has a solar decommissioning regulation.

A Department of Environment and Natural Resources spokesperson said solar solid waste is “an issue we are becoming aware of” as solar projects boom, likely due to the tax credit. The DENR also acknowledged concerns about the disposal of millions of pounds of solar panels, a number that is expected to increase by three to four-fold, plus.

The DENR officials stated that they “don’t have the data yet” on effects of herbicides sprayed on the solar farms to keep weeds and grass from blocking the panels, or how to return land to productive use once solar projects are removed.

To read the entire article, click here
Saturday 28 November 2020
28 Nov 2020 Posted by SR Editor Comments: 0 Views: 
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Large-scale solar arrays have the potential of taking thousands upon thousands of acres out of agricultural production
This is part of a great commentary by a retired farmer.

Large-scale solar arrays have the potential of taking thousands upon thousands of acres out of agricultural production nationwide. In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo has announced $1.5 billion in grants and incentives for large-scale solar arrays developed in New York. Taxpayers are now funding both farmland protection and solar developments that will remove thousands of acres from agricultural production.

In what universe does it make sense to spend taxpayer dollars to preserve valuable farmland, and at the same time we are spending taxpayer dollars to convert valuable farmland to other uses? What is even more troubling is the fact that the solar developers choose to use our best croplands for their projects.

The conversion of these highly productive soils will cause a shift of food production to less-productive lands. This will require more acreage, more fuel, more fertilizer, more seed, more pesticides, more water and more labor to produce the same amount of food and fiber. Add to this the fact that the world will need 50% to 70% more food and fiber in 30 years and we have a real problem.

This leads to another environmental issue: If we continue to develop our best cropland, where will our food and fiber come from? Will this accelerate the conversion of South American rainforest and African savannah to cropland? Will the more fragile, highly erodible land in our country that has been taken out of production be converted back to cropland? Will our forest land be returned to agricultural production as it was in the 19th century? What value do we place on our natural, wild, undeveloped lands for human, mental and physical well-being?

You can read the entire article HERE:
Saturday 22 August 2020
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Cost of Reclaiming Land Currently Used for Solar Panels
Attached is a pdf file discussing the “Cost of Reclaiming Land Currently Used for Solar Panels, Back to Farmland”

It discusses “ There are THREE main areas involved in returning solar facilities back to productive agricultural activities.

First there is the cost of the removal of equipment including the solar panels, the support structure, wiring, concrete stands, inverters, poles, fencing and buffer vegetation.

Second is mitigation of any heavy meal or herbicide residues.

Finally, there are the coast of restoring the soil properties that are essential to supporting crop productivity.

Each of these area involves the expenditure of time and money in order to restore the site to farmland.

Heiniger_Cost_of_Reclamation.pdf