Fires

Saturday 08 February 2020
08 Feb 2020 Posted by Bruce Boyett Comments: 0 Views: 
PV-on-fire.jpg
lawsuits over fires started by faulty solar panels

The following information should be a warning to ALL individuals considering living next door to a home with solar panels on their roof, installing solar panels on their own home or allowing any solar farms to be built close to a residential area.
 

As one homeowner said after a solar panel on his house started a fire, “I caution you on using Tesla or any solar company for that matter as while it can certainly save you money it may potentially cost you much much more. To us our family is way more valuable than any amount of money we would ever save.”
 

Here at Stop Solar Farms, we have shared multiple articles in the past, with documentation on how , solar panel components have CAUSED fires, as well as addressing the hazards of breathing the smoke from those fires, due to the toxic cancer causing agents contained inside the solar panels.
 

If 7 out of 248 homes in your town, caught on fire because of gas leaks or arson, how safe would you feel? Did you know that Walmart had solar panels catch on fire on 7 out of 248 stores and one of those solar panels started a fire months after the solar panel was de-energized?
 


How about if 1 out of 11 homes caught on fire, for the same reason? Would that concern you? Did you know that Amazon had the same brand of solar panels catch on fire on 1 out of 11 of their facilities?
 


But what if the solar company monitors the solar panels?
 

About five months after his panels had been removed, one homeowner said he heard from the company that is supposed to be monitoring his solar panels .  The homeowner was told his system had been flagged for bad connectors, at which time he responded, “I told them there was no system to maintain because they’d already caused a fire on my roof.”
 

The solar energy advocates spread tales of solar panels being safe and the National Fire Data Center that keeps statistics on causes of fires within the U.S.A., does not have any records of solar panels causing fires. However FIRES RESULTING FROM SOLAR PANELS ARE NOT DOCUMENTED and are simply classified as "other causes". Fortunately foreign countries such as Germany has documentation of at least 120 FIRES resulting from Solar Panels. The U.K. also has documentation on 80 fires that were started by faulty solar panels, while other countries including Japan have organizations that have investigated fires started by faulty solar panels and/or their components too.
 

Walmart, Amazon and multiple home owners all had fires as a result of Tesla Solar Panels.
 

Walmart alleged in court documents that all 248 of their stores that have the Tesla roof solar panels were at risk of fires.



Walmart originally started having solar panels installed on their buildings in 2010. Beginning as early as 2012, several of those stores began experiencing rooftop fires, but the company had written these off as isolated accidents.
 

However, a string of three fires in as many months was hard to ignore. Walmart then determined the fires originated in the Tesla solar panels. So Walmart asked Tesla to de-activate all of its Walmart solar panels pending an investigation.
 

One of the seven Walmart store fires resulted in injuries to multiple firefighters and a store employee, plus millions of dollars in damages. Another fire caused hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages, leaving the store closed for eight days.
 

Local news photographs and videos of one store fires showed a tremendous plume of black smoke emerging from flames as firefighters arrived at the scene and as it has been reported in safety articles by firefighting groups, smoke from certain solar panel fires contains hazardous toxic cancer causing agents.
 

In May 2018, Walmart suffered two blazes just eight days apart, one in Maryland and the other in California.
 

Walmart says that by May 2018, Tesla agreed to de-energize the solar systems at all 248 Walmart stores. But even that did not prevent at least two more fires, including one fire that took place months after the solar panel system was de-energized. 
 

In the case of one fire that took place after the solar panel system was de-energized, “Wires on the store’s rooftop were still sparking at the time that Walmart discovered the fire and could have ignited more extensive flames, with potentially devastating consequences,” the lawsuit states.
 

After having de-energized the solar panel systems at all 248 Walmart stores in 2018, Tesla went on to carry out safety inspections in 2019, hoping to find a way to re-energize the rooftop installations.
 

After inspecting just 29 stores, it found 157 items needing replacement or repair, “48 of which Tesla itself characterized as reflecting conditions that rendered the sites unsafe or potentially unsafe.”
 

Walmart's own follow-up inspections turned up even more problems.
 

Among the problems Walmart claims to have identified:

  • "Many of the Tesla solar panels inspected by Walmart were suffering from hotspots, resulting in cracking of the back sheets on solar modules and compromising electrical insulation."
  • "Making matters worse, Tesla had flagged or identified hotspots by placing pieces of tape over the affected areas. Because this tape prevented sunlight from reaching the solar panel, it exacerbated the problem by further concentrating heat."
  • "Tesla teams consistently failed to torque or tighten field-made connectors." "The lack of torqueing  leads to moisture and water intrusion."
  • "Sharp points—from, among other items, rough concrete or metal edges—were cutting into or abrading wires. In other cases, temperature changes resulted in the expansion and contraction of wires over time, moving the wires and resulting in their abrasion or exposure.
  • Multiple sites had improper grounding.

Within 90 days after filing this lawsuit, Walmart and Tesla settled, however there were also several other lawsuits against Tesla, and one of them was from Amazon because of one of their warehouses that contained solar panels from Tesla also caught on fire.
 



PROJECT TITAN
 

It seems that possibly as much as a year before the lawsuits from Walmart, Amazon and (multiple insurance companies that paid for homeowners losses from Solar Panel fires), Tesla had already discovered faulty parts within their panels and had begun a nationwide operation called “Project Titan,” that would quietly replace defective solar panel parts, such as connectors and optimizers. These are components which regulate the amount of energy and heat that flows to a solar panel which ensures that they don’t overheat, which could easily result in a fire.
 

It was reported that one of the parts Tesla repaired and/or replaced, was made by a company called Amphenol and it seems this same part was commonly used by a variety of solar panel companies, thus making us wonder how many faulty parts from this particular manufacture are still being used and how many more fires and potential lives are at risk.
 

Be sure to watch this website for additional investigations on the hidden dangers of solar panels, such as lies told about them withstanding 120 mph winds, when there have been reports of them flying through the air with a 60 mph wind. 
 


We will also be investigating hail damage, solar panels catching on fire while in the water, (electricity and water mixture isn't good), solar power plants killing birds including eagles, solar farms burning over 1,000 acres of land at a time, and the tons of toxic chemicals that will be leached into the ground once they are out of service and thrown in trash heaps instead of recycled.